3pfi at Camp Mustache 2019: A Break from Our Regularly Scheduled Program

(I will return to the 3 part permaculture and financial independence series I initiated next month.)

Would you have guessed that there are camps at which adults gather to geek out about money and lifestyle optimization? Well there are. After learning about them the wheels in my own head started spinning with thoughts of convening such an event for those looking to dive deeper into sustainable living as a path to financial independence retire early (FIRE). When I reached out to Vicki Robin, co-author of Your Money or Your Life, about this idea she suggested I get in touch with the organizers of one of the popular, already established FIRE events – Camp Mustache (CM), named after and organized by followers of the Mr. Money Mustache blog. Continue reading “3pfi at Camp Mustache 2019: A Break from Our Regularly Scheduled Program”

Permaculture FI Part 1: A Survey of the Online Landscape

I discovered permaculture about the same time I began contemplating financial independence and lifestyle design while reading Tim Ferriss’s first book The Four Hour Work Week. Once somebody elects to jump down the wonderful rabbit hole that is permaculture they usually find that the principles and philosophy behind it inherently lead them toward a less mainstream, more sustainability-focused lifestyle. With permaculture’s focus on growing food and more wisely stewarding resources, permaculture practitioners often start spending less money and more mindfully stewarding their financial (and other) resources in order to live a more fulfilling life on their own terms. Continue reading “Permaculture FI Part 1: A Survey of the Online Landscape”

The Dissonance of (FI) Philanthropy

The end of a calendar year finds many people fortunate enough to have discretionary income strategically doling out charitable contributions, giving in ways and amounts that enable them to support causes that are important to them, while maximizing tax breaks and other efficiencies within our financial structures. The Financial Independence Retire Early (FIRE) community is no exception and includes some who optimize even their philanthropic activities via donor advised funds. Continue reading “The Dissonance of (FI) Philanthropy”

Could Drawdown Be the Most Comprehensive Plan for Financial Independence Ever? – Part II

Previously, here at the home of 3pfi we reflected on how we might apply some of the solutions recommended in the book Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming and benefit from them in the pursuit of financial independence. In this post I’d like to continue these musings working our way through a few more of the one hundred solutions posited in the book. As outlined in that last post, the solutions are grouped into seven categories: energy; food; women and girls; buildings and cities; land use; transport; and materials. Continue reading “Could Drawdown Be the Most Comprehensive Plan for Financial Independence Ever? – Part II”

Could Drawdown Be the Most Comprehensive Plan for Financial Independence Ever? – Part I

Last month I attended a presentation by Paul Hawken editor of Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming, which was released last year. This plan developed by a team of scientists, consists of 80 solutions (see the summary here) grouped into seven categories: energy; food; women and girls; buildings and cities; land use; transport; and materials. I thought it could be interesting to ponder some of the suggested solutions in relation to the pursuit of financial independence. This seems especially timely given recent posts emphasizing sustainability and climate change on other FI oriented blogs, most notably Our Next Life and Tread Lightly, Retire Early. Continue reading “Could Drawdown Be the Most Comprehensive Plan for Financial Independence Ever? – Part I”

Looking Beyond Financial Capital on the Path to Financial Independence

The most well known and sought after form of capital is financial capital. Yet, there are a number of other forms of capital and they are almost never mentioned in the FIRE realm. Admittedly, they are for the most part less tangible and fungible, but they are forms of capital that are convertible inputs into financial capital. In fact, it seems to me all financial capital, at least initially, came about as a result of the conversion of another form of capital into money or financial capital. Combining different types of capital creates value. Creating value is the basis of creating wealth. While they don’t necessarily fit easily into spreadsheets, opening our eyes and minds to these other forms of capital can bring us closer to true financial freedom as well as a more joyful, meaningful life. Continue reading “Looking Beyond Financial Capital on the Path to Financial Independence”

Social Capital – an overlooked lever on the path to FIRE

Many of us pursuing financial independence and desiring to retire early are constantly checking spreadsheets, prowling the internet for more life hacks and optimization strategies, and sidehustling our way to greater savings. One thing I don’t hear discussed much in the FI world is the concept of social capital and what a tremendous lever it can be on our path to financial independence. It became clear to me this weekend when I made a presentation to my local ChooseFI group on the topic of building social capital how few people in the room were familiar with this terminology and line of thinking. Continue reading “Social Capital – an overlooked lever on the path to FIRE”

A Roundup of Sustainability and Financial Independence

Perusing the internet over the past couple years I have encountered a handful of financial independence (FI) bloggers and podcasters who are considering the environmental impact of their lifestyles. I find it heartening to find these posts and podcasts. Through this blog I would like to provide those interested with a forum to take this conversation to the next level beyond what has currently been covered in the FI community. This involves pondering how to reach FI through more environmentally and socially conscious investments, income generation, and actions versus the more traditional methods of index fund and rental property* investing. Continue reading “A Roundup of Sustainability and Financial Independence”

A Reluctant FI Blogger, But Nobody Else Is Talking About This

Is it possible to achieve financial independence (FI) while pursuing a triple bottom line, which values people, planet, and profit? I sure think so, but it’s not as straight forward as setting up monthly automatic deposits into low-cost broad based stock market index funds or investing in rental properties and later living off the 4% withdrawl rule, which seems to be the mainstream approach to FI currently. I certainly understand the appeal of these simpler approaches and am delighted that these options have made financial independence accessible to so many people. Continue reading “A Reluctant FI Blogger, But Nobody Else Is Talking About This”